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diaphragm valve

Diaphragm valve

API 6D

Diaphragm valves get their name from a flexible disc which comes into contact with a seat at the top of the valve body to form a seal. A diaphragm is a flexible, pressure responsive element that transmits force to open, close or control a valve. Diaphragm valves are related to pinch valves, but use an elastomeric diaphragm, instead of an elastomeric liner in the valve body, to separate the flow stream from the closure element.

Method Of Control
Diaphragm valves use a flexible diaphragm connected to a compressor by a stud which is molded into the diaphragm. Instead of pinching the liner closed to provide shut-off, the diaphragm is pushed into contact with the bottom of the valve body to provide shut-off. Manual diaphragm valves are ideal for flow control by offering a variable and precise opening for controlling pressure drop through the valve. The handwheel is turned until the desired amount of media is flowing through the system. For start and stop applications, the handwheel is turned until the compressor either pushes the diaphragm against the bottom of the valve body to stop flow or lifts off the bottom until flow is able to pass through.
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Diaphragm valves can be manual or automated. Their application is generally as shut-off valves in process systems within the industrial, food and beverage, pharmaceutical and biotech industries. The older generation of these valves is not suited for regulating and controlling process flows, however newer developments in this area have successfully tackled this problem.

Types of diaphragm valve

The weir-type design is the most popular type of diaphragm valve and it is best for general use applications or for tough corrosive and abrasive services. They are best used to control small flows. The body of the weir-type has a raised lip that the diaphragm comes into contact with. Weir-type valves use a smaller diaphragm because the material does not have to stretch as far. The material can be heavier so the valve can be used for high-pressure and vacuum services. The weir design is composed of a two-piece compressor component. To create a relatively small opening through the center of the valve, the first increment of stem travel raises an inner compressor component that causes only the central part of the diaphragm to lift instead of the entire diaphragm lifting off the weir when the valve is opened. Once the inner compressor is opened, the outer compressor piece is lifted along with the inner compressor and the additional throttling is similar to the throttling function in other valves. Weir-type bodies have bonnet assemblies recommended for handling dangerous liquid or gas because if the diaphragm fails the hazardous materials will not be released into the surrounding system. They are also recommended for food-processing applications because the body is self-draining.

The straight through type can be used in situations where the flow direction changes within the system. The body of this design has a flat bottom that is parallel to the flow stream. This allows the flow to move uninhibited through the valve with no major obstructions. A flexible material is required for the diaphragm so that the mechanism can reach the bottom of the valve body; this can shorten the life span of the diaphragm. They are excellent for use with sludge, slurries and other viscous fluids but they are not well suited for high temperature fluids.

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